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Southern Peach Cobbler

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Just peachy.

This Southern peach cobbler recipe is a total winner: easy, tender drop biscuit topping over a fresh peach filling made even easier because you don’t have to peel the fresh peaches! You’ll enjoy this old-fashioned peach cobbler all summer long. 

southern peach cobbler after baking

Meet This Southern Peach Cobbler Recipe

For my money, no region of the country does homey, rustic, and deeply, deeply satisfying like the American South. From simple tomato sandwiches to this southern peach cobbler recipe, these foods take the best of seasonal, good-quality ingredients and make them into something even more special, without much fuss.

This peach cobbler recipe comes from the old southern tradition, going back to early British-American colonial food traditions that combined (“cobbled”) together what was available for a simple dessert.

With juicy, ripe Georgia and South Carolina peaches, plus a tender biscuit topping, this recipe makes an incredible summer dessert or breakfast bake. Start your oven. Let’s jump in.

Do You Have to Peel Peaches for Cobbler?

Absolutely not! You do not have to peel peaches for baked peach cobblers and pie. Leave those peaches unpeeled. Keeping those beautiful skins on gives the cooked cobbler a gorgeous, deep peachy-pink hue and even more depth of flavor. Plus, unlike other cobbler or pie fruit with tougher skins, like apples, peach skins melt away into the cobbler filling.

Unlike many peach pie or cobbler recipes, I do not peel the peaches. Ever. The unpeeled peaches, coupled with an easy drop biscuit crust, makes this just about the easiest peach cobbler recipe ever. Peach cobbler is my favorite dessert of summer, and maybe all year.

plate of ripe Georgia peaches on serving tray

What’s the Difference Between Cobbler and Pie?

Without getting too deep into food history and regional nuances, generally speaking, fruit cobbler is a more rustic baked dessert with a biscuit or batter topping.

Pie consists of a fruit filling encased in a flaky dough and baked. We could also get into fruit crisps — which have a streusel topping — and buckles, betties, slumps, crumbles, and pandowdies, but let us save all that for another time.

cut fruit for southern peach cobbler in pie plate with cinnamon sugar

One practical difference? Cobblers are easier. I say this as an avowed pie lover who has apple pie for my birthday instead of cake.

Pie dough involves rolling, chilling, rolling some more, draping, cutting, and creasing. But a cobbler requires only a simple biscuit dough loosely dropped on top of the fruit, and baked.

This unpeeled peach cobbler tastes every bit as satisfying as pie, but requires less effort and gives off cute “country picnic” vibes.

raw Georgia peach cobbler with biscuit topping

Ingredients and Steps

This peach cobbler recipe uses the following ingredients for the peach filling:

  • Fresh peaches
  • Sugar
  • Ground cinnamon
  • Lemon juice
  • All-purpose flour (which I prefer to cornstarch as a thickener because cornstarch can taste chalky)

For the biscuit topping, you will need:

  • All-purpose flour
  • Baking powder
  • Sugar (you can substitute half as light brown sugar if you’d like)
  • Salt
  • Butter (you’ll need 6 tbsp; less than one stick)
  • Egg
  • Milk

How to make the peach cobbler (recipe steps):

Grease or butter a 9″ pie plate or baking dish, and preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.

Slice each of the fresh peaches around its equator. Remove the pit and cut the peaches into thick wedges. Add to a large mixing bowl, along with the sugar, cinnamon, flour, and lemon juice. Stir the mixture to combine, and set aside.

Make the Biscuit Topping

  • In a small bowl, whisk together the milk and egg. Set aside.
  • In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder until fully combined and aerated.
  • Add the butter and work through with your fingers or a pastry blender until everything is combined into a combination of flour and pea-sized, buttery crumbles.
  • Add the milk and egg mixture, and stir with your fingers and knead very lightly until just combined into a sticky, shaggy mass.

To Bake and Finish the Southern Peach Cobbler

  • Pour the peach cobbler filling from the bowl into the pie shell and bake, uncovered, for 20 minutes.
  • Pull the peaches from the oven. Drop large pieces of biscuit all over the top of the peaches. Sprinkle with sugar.
  • Return the whole thing to the oven and bake for an additional 30 to 40 minutes, until everything is a bubbling golden brown.

Southern Peach Cobbler Recipe: Notes and Tips

This cobbler is very easy, but you can make it even easier by using the right techniques and tips. In essence, you will cut the fresh peaches, toss them with flour, ground cinnamon, sugar, and lemon juice, and bake them in a baking dish for about 20 minutes. Then, add the biscuit topping, sprinkle with sugar, and finish baking in the oven.

Read on for more cobbler tips and notes.

How to cut peaches like a pro

If you look at a peach, you’ll see that it actually has two hemispheres. To cut a peach, slice along the hemisphere, all the way to the pit, as you would an avocado. Then twist open, remove the pit, and cut into wedges.

  • As previously stated, do not peel the peaches. Get that beautiful peachy-pink color and added peach flavor.
  • That said, you can peel the peaches if you want to. I get that some people want that classic golden-yellow peach pie color. In which case, to peel a peach for baking, score an X in the bottom of the peaches with a paring knife, then blanch them in boiling water for a minute. Drain, and peel when cool enough to handle.
  • The cobbler topping should be sticky and loose, not a tight ball. If the dough achieves tight ball status, it is overmixed and will be a little tough.

How long to bake the peach cobbler

Bake this southern peach cobbler for about 50 minutes total. First, you will par-bake the peaches in the oven before adding the biscuit topping — don’t forget to sprinkle the top with sugar.

The filling should be bubbly, and the topping golden brown. Make sure you let the cobbler cool for at least 30 minutes before cutting into it. Easier said than done, granted, but this allows the juices to congeal, and the flavor tastes better when it is not scalding hot.

Using frozen or canned peaches

What could be more special than hacking summer in the middle of winter? Slicing and freezing peaches for later in the year is a great way to indulge in the feeling of warmer months. This cobbler can definitely be made with fresh frozen peaches. No need to defrost first!

While I do recommend frozen or fresh peaches, I do not generally recommend using canned peaches for this easy Southern peach cobbler recipe. I find the texture and flavor to be too “off” from that of fresh or frozen peaches. Further, canned peaches are often packed in sweet syrup, which will mess with the recipe proportions for the cobbler filling.

How to serve this cobbler

Keep it simple. Serve each person a big spoonful of cobbler, then add a scoop of vanilla ice cream or dollop of fresh whipped cream.

southern peach cobbler sliced on plate with tea

This easy peach cobbler recipe is easy to love. You’ll also like these American-inspired desserts:

Southern peach cobbler recipe

Southern Peach Cobbler

This easy peach cobbler recipe from the American south makes a sweet, satisfying dessert. Keep the peaches unpeeled for ease and a gorgeous color.
Prep Time20 minutes
Cook Time50 minutes
Course: Baked Goods, Dessert
Cuisine: American
Keywords:: cobbler, peach cobbler, peaches, southern, summer desserts, summer recipes
Servings: 1 9" deep-dish pie pan
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Ingredients

For the Filling

  • 8 to 10 ripe medium-sized fresh peaches
  • 1/2 to 2/3 cup sugar, depending on how ripe and sweet the peaches are
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • squirt fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour

For the Biscuits

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon sugar, plus more to top cobbler
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup cold butter (about 6 tablespoons), cut into small pieces
  • scant 1/3 cup milk
  • 1 egg

Instructions

For the Peach Cobbler Filling

  • Grease or butter a 9" pie plate or baking dish, and preheat the oven to 425°F.
  • Slice each fresh peach around the equator. Remove the pit and cut the peaches into thick wedges. Add to a large mixing bowl, along with the sugar, cinnamon, flour, and lemon juice. Mix to combine, and set aside.
    TIP: You can substitute half the sugar for packed light brown sugar if you'd like to give it a more caramel flavor.

For the Biscuit Topping

  • In a small bowl, whisk together the milk and egg. Set aside.
  • In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder until fully combined and aerated.
  • Add the diced butter and work through with your fingers or a pastry blender until everything is combined into a combination of flour and pea-sized, buttery crumbles. Do not overmix.
  • Add the milk and egg mixture, and stir with your fingers and knead very lightly until just combined into a sticky, shaggy mass.

To Bake and Finish the Southern Peach Cobbler

  • Pour the peach filling into the pie shell and bake in the center rack, uncovered, for 20 minutes.
    PRO TIP: I recommend placing your baking dish on a rimmed sheet pan to catch any juices that bubble over. Peach cobblers tend to get juicy!
  • Pull the baking peaches from the oven. Drop large pieces of biscuit all over the top of the peaches. Sprinkle with sugar.
  • Return the whole thing to the oven and bake for an additional 30 to 40 minutes, until everything is a bubbling golden brown.
    PRO TIP: Check the cobbler after about 20 to 25 minutes. If the biscuits are starting to look too brown, tent with foil.
  • Cool for 20 to 30 minutes, uncovered, before serving warm, preferably with a scoop of vanilla ice cream or a spoonful of fresh whipped cream.
    PRO TIP: Waiting a bit before serving allows the peaches to set up so that the filling will not be overly runny -- or too hot.

Notes

Southern peach cobbler is best fresh from the oven because the biscuit topping will be at its most tender. This will keep, covered or in an airtight container, for about two days. 
You can reheat the cobbler at 325 degrees F.
Here's a good baking tip for reheating cobblers and pies: Never reheat pies and cobbler at the same temperature as you baked it. If you use a very oven to reheat, the cobbler will brown and get very hot on the outside but remain cool on the inside.

17 comments

  • Janessa H.

    5 stars
    Made this with the final peaches of the season and did not disappoint. the biscuits are YUMMY and it was so easy to not peel the peaches.

    • Unpeeled

      Thanks, Janessa! So glad you enjoyed it. I’m always sad when peach season is done, but then we can move right into apples and pumpkin 🙂

  • How can I add pecans to the peach cobbler?

    • Unpeeled

      Hi! I would fold some into the biscuit topping. Try half a cup!

  • Lauren Packer

    5 stars
    You always have the best cobbler recipes. I made this last summer with great success and just printed the recipe out to make it again now that peaches are coming in. Thank you and hope you are enjoying summer. This is a good recipe and I have recommended your website to others.

  • 5 stars
    Just pulled this out of the oven! Looks and smells delicious!!!’ Super easy

  • Made this last week!!! SO GOOD and so easy. My advice is to Cut the peaches smaller than the recipe says so they’re bitesize. The peel adds a wonderful flavor and color but if not cut small enough it’s hard to bite through but it’s seriously the easiest best recipe!

    • Unpeeled

      Yea!!! I am so glad you liked it. And isn’t the color just gorgeous? 🙂

  • Shaz Mac

    I never peel and I toss the peaches in a little dry custard powder with no added sugar. This makes it nice and tart ! Beautiful ?

    • Joanne Minuete

      Have 25 lb 0eaches from The Peach Truck almost ripe and moving next week. What is best way to freeze this. I may use Bisquick topping since pressed for time.

      • Unpeeled

        Hi! Slice them into wedges when ripe and then freeze. That way, they are ready to be added to a cobbler or pie right away.

    • Unpeeled

      Sounds lovely! I love a little tartness in desserts.

  • 5 stars
    Came out great. This is so easy! I love that it is just as good as pie without having to make a pie crust.

  • 5 stars
    Why have I been peeling peaches for years??!!
    This was so delicious and loved the pretty peachy color ?
    Thank you Lisa
    Amy

  • 5 stars
    I baked this over the weekend and it was delicious.

  • helen bond

    5 stars
    ?

4.72 from 14 votes (6 ratings without comment)

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